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 Post subject: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2002 9:00 am 
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Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2002 3:01 am
Posts: 45
I just completed replacing my shift rod bushing and linkage on my 74 ghia and was having a little trouble getting the shift plate assembly repositioned. I ran across this guide online during a marathon surf session and unfortunately I don't remember where I C&P'd it from. Apologies to the author Image Anyway, I thought I'd share it with the group...

If you are having problems with:

1st gear - Adjust the shifter back

1st and 2nd - Adjust the shifter to the right

2nd gear - Adjust the shifter forward

1st and 3rd - Adjust the shifter adjust to the back

2nd and 4th - Adjust to the front

3rd - Adjust back

3rd and 4th - Adjust left

4th - Adjust forward

Reverse: adjust the shifter right or front; but just a little. Reverse could be an internal transmission problem.


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 Post subject: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2002 3:40 pm 
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...but you should lift up the inspection cover and make sure that you can feel the transmission making it all the way into its detent positions. For example, over-adjusting forward in an attempt to increase 2nd & 4th engagement can leave your transmission incapable of going fully into 1st & 3rd. The internal shift forks of a VW trans are set up when it's built, and unless the external linkage is badly misadjusted so that the internal shiftrods aren't able to make it to their detent positions, external adjustment isn't going to fix a transmission that's jumping out of gear.

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`67, 69, `77 Beetles, `73 II (Type I engine), `86 Audi 5000s, etc. etc.
Independent VW specialist shop manager/unit repairman 1978-1991
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 Post subject: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2002 2:32 pm 
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very true. i had a tough time with that plate also...so i just put it all together and left the bolts loose...(no i didn't drive the car around town like that!) then shift into all the gears a few times...the plate centers itself kinda...tighten down the bolts and see where you stand with that...it gives you a ballpark figure anyways...you will be able to feel your tranny engauge in the gears then.


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 Post subject: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2002 2:38 pm 
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"you will be able to feel your tranny engauge in the gears then."

True with a stock shifter and one of the reasons that I prefer them. Not-so-true with a Hurst-style shifter that doesn't let you feel what's going on inside the trans. Now that I think about it, I'd say most of the trannies I've seen with damage caused by shifter misadjustment had non-stock shifters or a quick-shift kit.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2009 5:26 pm 
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I thought this thread could use a little bump anyone have any more info on what to look at when you have shifting problems and how to check and fix the problems. We really need a shifter thread sticky.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2009 5:39 pm 
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74airbug wrote:
A sloppy shift linkage is not only a P-I-A, it can get you and your Bug both killed...

First check out Glenn Ring's tech page:

http://www.glenn-ring.com/tech/bushing_replace.htm

Get a piece of light-weight aluminum tubing an inch or inch-and-a-quarter diameter, about 5ft long. On one end split it lengthwise 3-4 inches and open it out a little, making a U-shape channel. Slip it in (split-end first) through the 3 access holes, (front apron, behind spare tire, frame head) until you get it to the front of the shift rod. Slip the front coupling of the shift rod into the U-shaped channel and tie-wrap it securely. You can then ease the shift rod completely out of the vehicle.

When you have the shift rod out, clean it thoroughly. Mine had some surface rust on it so I cleaned it up with some solvent and polished it up a little with a 00 Scotch-Brite pad and applied a light coating of grease the entire length. Also if have compressed air available, you might want to blow out the tunnel, from rear to front.

Replacing the bushing is no trick. My old one was non-existant so I just slipped the new one in. Be sure your bracket is not worn so bad the bushing just slips through (if the bracket is worn out, that's a whole 'nother story...). Mine was a little loose, but the bushing fit in OK and tightened up when I put the shift rod back through it. Be sure to grease it up pretty good.

Replacing the shift rod is pretty much the reverse of getting it out. With your aluminum tubing attached, feed the rod back through the access holes until you see the rear end through the shifter hole. Get the end started into the bushing. Be sure it's centered in the bushing. You can then go to the front of the car and bump then end of the alum tubing until it slides through. It will be a little tight at first, as the rod end expands the bushing as it goes through. Slip the rod in a little at a time.

Note of warning - there are several important pieces of tubing in the tunnel, the most important being the metal fuel line. If the rod meets resistance, pull it back out a little and try again. If the rod end is on the bottom of the tunnel it will bind on the cable and fuel tubings. The rod needs to be up off the floor of the tunnel and pointed at the transaxle shifter. You may have to reach in through the rear access hole and guide the rod through.

I used a new EMPI urethane coupling. I used the urethane bushings and the new screws but reused the OE bushing bracket. It was still tight on the shaft and just looked better than the new bracket. I also opted to install a new EMPI trigger shifter (short rod). Just stick the ball of the shifter into the coupling and bolt it down. I adjusted the shifter to about the middle of the adjustment range.

Worked great the first time and I am quite pleased with it. No more trying to leave a stop light in 3rd, no more grinding reverse to get into 2nd, and no more shifting back into 1st when you trying to get in 3rd...


Image
Image

hazetguy wrote:
Packfan wrote:
Okay, mine definitely wasn't going to have a gap when done. Maybe they make them in different sizes?


no. there is one size and there should be a small gap when properly installed. the gap should face to the side.
i would highly recommend using a Genuine VW shift rod bushing. yes, they are still available from VW. they are expensive, but made of a very nice material. the aftermarket ones made of harder plastic are, to put it politely, poop and not worth the time to install.

i just did this job on a 65 beetle. the front bushing was completely gone, the rear coupler was broken. finding gears was a challenge to say the least. after the new bushing (Genuine VW of course) and coupler "pads" were installed, it shifted like a VW should. crisp, accurate, nice. the customer keeps thanking me for fixing it.

here are some pics i took while doing the job.

A rattling shift rod was cause for suspicion about the condition of the front shift bushing. The old bushing had completely disintegrated and was completely missing.
Image

Coupler removed, showing worn and broken bushings.
Image

Old, broken bushings (top), compared to new ones (bottom).
Image

After removing the shifter, and front cover plates, the shift rod gets pushed forward through the frame tunnel in to the spare tire well. Thoroughly clean all the old grease off the ball socket end of the rod.
Image

Original VW rear coupler, parts cleaned and new bushings. Also shown is a Genuine VW front shift rod bushing and retaining ring.
Image

This is the orientation of the bushing when installed (front of vehicle being to the right). Slot in bushing faces the side. I like to put the overlap of the ring at the top.
Image

Bushing installed in the bracket. Grease liberally before trying to push the shift rod through.
Image

Make sure the end of the shift rod is thoroughly greased, as well as the inside of the new bushing. Getting that first "push" of the rod through the bushing is tight, but once the rod is started in the bushing, grease liberally along the entire length while pushing the rod.
Image

Using pliers to move the rod rearward through the bushing.
Image


After some minor adjustments, the end of the shift rod is in the proper position.
Image

Put grease in the shift rod ball socket.
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All shifter parts thoroughly cleaned, inspected, ready to be reinstalled.
Image

The one, the only, the proper way to install the shift rod plate. Plate was greased after the pic was taken.
Image

All parts of the shifter liberally greased, ready to be installed.
Image

Shifter installed and adjusted. Smooth as butter.
Image


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 Post subject: Re: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:49 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2011 1:03 pm
Posts: 11
Hi:
I am in the process of replaceing the shifter and the coupler and the front rod guide on my dune buggy.
I just got question about locating the correct position of the shift rod coming out of the trans.
if the rod is all the forward (towards front of vechicle what gear is that?
then what is the order of gears as the rod is pushed back.
Will it fall back ito place on it's own when all is installed.
VW's are new to me so please excuse my lack of knowledge.
Rob S aka:rseasy1959


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 Post subject: Re: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2011 1:03 pm
Posts: 11
Hi:
I Just had to make a new shifter rod for my dune buggy,I have it installed but can't get it positioned right !
I need to find step by step instuctions on the adjustment procedures the chassis has been cut down so the rod had to be custom fitted.
I have a turn buckle in the rod for lenght and can also be adjusted for left and right movement.I used the old one as a guide so not sure
how accurate the newly made one is.
At this time it is a real cluster.......
any help available.
Thanks rseasy1


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 Post subject: Re: shifter adjustment guide
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 4:43 pm 
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Read this thread it might help you.
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... k#p1090776

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