Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Discuss VW transaxles and transmissions. Gearheads wanted!

Moderator: Henryhoehandle

Post Reply
Casting Timmy
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:42 pm

Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Casting Timmy » Fri Mar 25, 2016 2:21 pm

Separate Topics

1 2 5mm sliders
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... r#p1215657

1st gear synchro
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... b#p1210847

Difference in 3/4 sliders
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... 0&t=124219

3rd and 4th Synchro RIngs
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... c#p1178274

Spacer or spring
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... r#p1219572


I am trying to put together a list of the type 1 part numbers and years and descriptions as well as notes about the parts. Some of these sections are definitely a lot farther along than others. I will keep working on this and updating it, but please point out anything that's wrong or parts/descriptions I have missed.

Been getting a lot of help just to get this far.

Thanks
Tim

1-2 Slider Hub
There are two common versions of the slider hub, a version with a line on the hub and a ver-sion without it. The version without the line will take a shim over the small pinion nut, but the version with the line does not require a shim. (Hint: Early swing axle transaxles came with 1-2 hubs full of drive teeth and not spaced out like later models. An early hub can be used if available and will be an upgrade in strength for your transaxle. It will use shims like the early IRS hub.)
113-311-243 (Unknown)
113-311-243A Is this the full drive flank version in early swing axles?
113-311-243B Partial Drive Flanks, requires shims ??-Aug 75 T1
113-311-243C Identification Line on hub to show no shims required. Sept 75-79 T1

1-2 Sliders (26mm Slider is 1.02” wide and a 25mm Slider is .98” wide)
113-311-255 44 tooth Slider w/no lines and a 4.2mm (.165”) grove when new for 61-66 T1 (26mm Slider)
• Mates to 17 tooth caged style reverse (17/44 Gear)
• Uses 110 degree synchro on both sides
?? teeth w/1 line 67 T1 (25mm Slider)
• Mates to 17 tooth caged style reverse with 1 lines for T1 (17/?? Gear)
• Uses 110 degree synchro on both sides
113-311-255A 43 tooth Slider w/2 lines and a 4.1mm grove when new for 68-Jan 71 T1 (25mm Slider)
• Mates to 17 tooth caged style reverse with 2 lines for T1 (17/43 Gear)
• Uses 110 degree synchro on both sides
113-311-255B 43 tooth Slider w/2 lines and annular grove on shoulder next to shift fork slot and a 4.1mm grove when new for Jan 71-72.5 T1 (25mm Slider)
• Mates to 17 tooth caged style reverse with 2 lines for T1 (17/43 Gear)
• Uses 110 degree synchro on first gear side and 120 degree synchro on second gear side.
113-311-255C 40 tooth slider and a 5.3mm (.209”) grove when new for 72.5+ T1 (25mm Slider)
• Mates to 15 tooth non-caged reverse (Internal splines as required for shaft, which will be coarse or fine)
• Uses 110 degree synchro on first gear side and 120 degree synchro on second gear side.


1-2 Synchronizers
The general rule of thumb for IRS is for 2nd gear to have 3 notches along the outside to de-note a 120 degree synchronizer ring. The first gear side should have a 110 degree synchronizer ring, but since they only make the 120 degree rings now they are substituted on the first gear side as well. Multiple transaxle builders will comment that used VW synchro-nizer rings in spec will shift better than new replacement synchronizer rings, so don’t be afraid to reuse synchronizer rings.
113-311-269 10.5mm Narrow key slot synchro, will grind if put accidentally on second gear
113-311-269A 110 Degree Synchro 12.7mm wide key slot
113-311-269B 120 Degree Synchro 12.7mm wide key slot (3 Notches on outside)

Pre 66 Swing Axle
113-311-247A 1st Only (Smaller ID)
113-311-295A 2nd-4th

Interesting synchro
113-311-247C 110 degree synchro with 10.75mm slot. The factory switched back and forth between this one and the 269A with the wider slots. The shorter slots make it easier to get into gear without gear jamming, but easier to grind if you don’t want long enough for the mainshaft to stop spinning before going into gear. A factory tech bulletin was issued for no-tifying the customer of waiting after pushing in the clutch to keep from grinding, but eventually the factory went back to the wider slots.

1-2 Bearings
These are larger in diameter than the 3-4 bearings and can have metal or plastic cages. Typ-ically metal cages are preferred as the needles are longer and give more support to the gear. Metal cages also allow more room for oil as well as single spaced needles over double stacked needles.

1-2 Shift Fork – Section is far from done
The clamping bolt is very close to the edge of the fork and this one comes to a pointy tip on one end. The 3-4 shift fork has the clamping bolt in the middle so it is easy to sort if you have one of each. Early IRS is usually a brass shift fork, which does not hold up to hard shifting as well as steel.
Early 1-2 Shift Fork, 3.95mm (.155”) when new and 3.6mm (.142”) min used, 69-72.5 T1
Late 1-2 Shift Fork, 4.85mm (.190”) when new and 4.5mm (.177”) min used, 72.5+ T1

3-4 Slider Hub
PN#? Keyed hubs are used with keyed main shafts 61-72.5 T1
• Early hubs have a large radius that require the chamfered synchro rings
• Later hubs eliminated the radius and use the synchro rings with a small chamfer
PN#? Splined hubs are used with splined main shafts 72.5+ T1

3-4 Slider
Early 113 style 3-4 Slider with 4.2mm (.165”) grove when new for 61-71.5 T1
• Uses 110 degree synchros on both sides
Late 113 style 3-4 Slider no relief for late gears and two annular groves, one on each side of shift fork slot and a 5.3mm (.209”) grove when new for 71.5-72.5 T1
• Uses 120 degree synchros on both sides.
002-311-315 3-4 Slider with relief for late gears and a 5.3mm (.209”) grove when new for 72.5+ T1
• Uses 120 degree synchros on both sides.
113-311-315
113-311-315A Narrow Grove
113-311-315B
113-311-315C Wide Grove

3-4 Synchronizers
These are smaller in diameter than the 1-2 synchronizers. Today two versions are sold, a 110 (295A) and a 120 (295D) degree synchro. The 120 degree ring is easiest to identify with the semicircular cutouts to unbalance the synchro to eliminate fourth gear howling when cold. The 110 degree synchro is for older sliders with 110 angles. The factory moved to 120 de-grees to make shifting easier and the factory manual lists and told techs to convert to the new style when rebuilding.
113-309-295 Split Case Synchro Rings 53-60
• Teeth completely around outside of synchro
• Thinner than later syncrhos
• Chamfered to fit into recess of 3-4 clutch gear
113-311-295A 110 Degree Synchro (Pre 66 2nd and Pre 68 3rd and 4th)
• Chamfer eliminated to allow synchro to center better in clutch hub (Hub opened up)
113-311-295B (Unknown)
113-311-295C 110 Degree Synchro with 11mm slots (Factory discontinued in early 70’s)
113-311-295D 120 Degree Synchro with 11mm slots 4 semi-circular cutouts to imbalance synchro (3 notches on outside) 72+
• 4semi-circular cutouts added to eliminate howling with cold gear box.
• Factory manual mentions adding 4 semicircular cutouts and not changing part num-ber. Also stated to use old versions on 3rd and new on 4th, so maybe the “D” was first produced without the cutouts?


3-4 Bearings
These are smaller in diameter than the 1-2 bearings and can have metal or plastic cages. Typically metal cages are preferred as the needles are longer and give more support to the gear. Late 3-4 bearings are split to fit over the splines on the main shaft, early metal caged bearings can be converted with a thin cutoff wheel. (Only 3rd has to be split, 4th does not have to be split on the 113/002 mainshaft)

3-4 Shift Fork – Section is far from done….have not looked into forks yet.
The clamping bolt is away from the edge and this shift fork does not have the pointy tip like a 1-2 shift fork.
Early 3-4 Shift Fork, Steel, 3.95mm (.155”) when new and 3.6mm (.142”) min used, ?? T1
Late 3-4 Shift Fork, Steel, 4.85mm (.190”) when new and 4.5mm (.177”) min used, 7?+ T1

Shift Rails
Early 1-2 Shift rail no line on head 61-66 T1 (Use with 26mm Sliders)
Late 1-2 Shift rail with line on head 67+ T1 (Use with 25mm Sliders)
• The detents are farther apart for longer throw of slider
Early 3-4 Shift Rail no line on head 61-72.5 T1
Late 3-4 Shift Rail with line on head 72.5+ T1
• The detents are farther apart for longer throw of slider

Main shafts and Gears
10 tooth mainshaft with nut on the end. All or some had narrow 1st and all or some had nar-row 1st gear idler.??? Do not know about early stuff.
10 tooth mainshaft with clip on end, 17 teeth for second with keyed area for 3-4 hub (?-Oct 72)
• Mates to 38 tooth first (No line around gear teeth) and 35 tooth 2nd
Late main shaft/ 113/002 with 9 teeth for first gear w/line on teeth, 17 teeth for second with splined area for 3-4 hub (Nov 72-79)
• Mates to 34 tooth first (Line around gear teeth) and 35 tooth 2nd
• Some call this the “Super Beetle” main shaft, but it came in everything after 72.5 (Standard Beetles, Ghias, Things all had this main shaft)
Early 3rd and 4th gears have the thrust face (Oil grove cutouts) on synchronizer cone, gears can be coarse or fine tooth in beetles, but coarse tooth in buses 61-72.5 T1
• Mates to keyed hubs
• Can be converted to work with late main shaft
o Gear must be bored to 1.685” down to polished bearing surface
o Late splined hub must be turned down to 1.65” on center protrusion
o Thicker washer must be installed behind synchronizer cone
o Use slider and shift rail mentioned below
Late 3rd and 4th gears have the thrust face (Oil grove cutouts) on gear face, beetle gears are fine tooth and bus gears are coarse tooth 72.5+ T1
• Mates to splined hub
• Must use slider with cutouts for 002 gears and late 3-4 shift rail with line on head
• Bus gears if the desired ratio is correct can be used in beetles to get coarse tooth gears.
o Coarse tooth gears take more abuse and handle particles in the transaxle bet-ter.
o Fine tooth gears are cheaper to produce but are also quieter.

Reverse Shafts and Idlers
The obvious part is keyed idlers to the keyed reverse shafts and splined idlers to splined shafts. Reverse shaft bearings with a hole in the side are for earlier cases that have a bolt to hold the bearing cage in place. Later cases used a reverse shaft bearing without the hole and have no bolt hole on the side of the case. The later cases without the hole can use either a coarse spline or a fine spline reverse shaft, and will require the correct matching reverse gear. The coarse spline shaft has two sliding reverse gears and two versions of the shaft. The earlier of these two shafts will have splines the full length on that end of the shaft. The later coarse tooth version has a circular cut through these splines as the shaft was changed to hold reverse better. This shaft also takes a different sliding reverse gear that has equally spaced splines as opposed to the earlier narrow and wide gap sliding reverse gear splines.
• 20 tooth idler mates to 14 tooth input coupler (Single line on outside of teeth) (up to Oct 72)
• 17 tooth idler ( 2 lines on outside of teeth) mates to 12 tooth coupler (from Nov 72)

Reverse Shaft
113-311-515
113-311-515A
113-311-515B This shaft is for the 15 tooth reverse with alternating narrow and wide spline spacing
113-311-515C This shaft is for the 15 tooth sliding reverse gear (gear identified by single line cut through top of teeth) with equally spaced splines. Shaft has a circular grove cut in splines and was designed and produced to hold the sliding reverse gear in reverse better.

Sliding Reverse Gears
113-311-531
113-311-531A Caged 17/44? – Weddle’s sight has a lot of errors
113-311-531B Caged 17/43? – Weddle’s sight has a lot of errors
113-311-531C 15 tooth gear with narrow and wide spaced splines
113-311-531D Factory Manual Skipped this Rev
113-311-531E 15 tooth gear with single line cut through top of teeth. Internal splines are equally spaced vs the previously narrow and wide spaced version.

Reverse Lever Systems
These have to be used as the system noted below, some of the two piece adjustment boxes have very slight differences. Keep the lever with the adjustment box if possible, stamped adjustment boxes can have different inside widths and inside heights.
Caged Reverse (up to Feb 72)
• Reverse gear has material on both sides of teeth
• Reverse lever has 2 pins on it, both a single diameter
• Reverse adjustment box has open top and a rotation stop (Only one not two stamp-ings welded together.)

Paddle Reverse (March 72-?)
• Reverse gear has undercut grove in it.
• Reverse lever has a post for the eyelet and a hole for the paddle.
• Reverse adjustment box is two stamped pieces welded together.

Post Reverse (?-79)
• Reverse gear has undercut grove in it.
• Reverse lever has a post for the eyelet and a 2 diameter post for the reverse gear. (Two versions of this exist, a 23mm and a 21mm box contact to pivot point length)
• Reverse adjustment box is two stamped pieces welded together.

Reverse Lever
113-311-581
113-311-581A Caged Style Lever w/12mm Circle, eyelet set @ 1.502+/-.016” (up to Feb 72)
113-311-581B Paddle Style Lever w/12mm Circle, eyelet set @ 1.598+/-.016” (March- June 72)
113-311-581C Paddle Style Lever w/14mm Circle, eyelet set @ 1.709+/-.016” (July 72-?)
113-311-581D Post Style Lever w/23mm Pivot, eyelet set @ 1.709+/-.016” (?-March 75)
113-311-581E Post Style Lever w/21mm Pivot, eyelet set @ 1.709+/-.016” (March 75-?)
113-311-581F Post style with 091 length pin (Use with fine spline reverse gear) (?-?)

Cases and Side Covers
The early cases 69-72.5 are double side covers and can be either the old style pinion bearing or the new larger pinion bearing. The 4 bolt pinion bearing was used until July 69, then the big nut pinion bearing started in August of 69. The first of the big nut pinion bearings used a nut with a slit in the side (August 69-August 71). These are notorious for coming loose and the factory put out a bulletin of the change and notice to switch to the peenable nuts. The double side cover cases are desired for mid-engine cars since the diff can be flipped to the other side. In Nov 72 the single side cover cases came out and these are stronger than the double side cover cases, but not as strong as the 75 and later “ZigZag” cases. The 75 and later IRS case has an offset rib over the diff area, the case split comes down the center of the bell housing and then over the diff the split line is offset towards the diff cover in-creasing the strength of the transaxle case over the diff where it needs it.

Technically there are a few more distinguishing features between 69-Nov 72. 69 is the only year with 2 drain plugs. This can be hard in talking to someone not familiar with transaxles as the fill plug gets counted. In 70 they added a boss for the guide sleeve for the throw out bearing, but didn’t drill and tap the holes. These can easily be converted by drilling and tap-ping the M7x1.0 bolt holes yourself. In 71 they drilled and tapped at the factory and switched over to the new style throw out bearing. The last change was late in 72 with the clutch shaft moving to the larger 20mm diameter with the single side cover cases.

The double side cover cases come with the weakest side covers, although these side covers are aluminum and not magnesium like the earlier swing axle boxes. This is where the use of heavy duty side covers really works, the magnesium swing axle side covers flex a lot. The first single side cover boxes came with an additional ring in the middle of the side cover. The “ZigZag” cases came with a double ring side cover, this time the additional ring is on the inside edge of the outer flat area of the side cover.

Transaxle Cases
113-301-051H 4 bolt pinion 69-July 69
113-301-051K Big Nut Pinion Case with 2 clips instead of screw for mainshaft bearing Au-gust 69- June 70
111-301-051B Centrally located throw out bearing was added July 70 – August 71
111-301-051D 20mm Clutch Shaft Sept 71 – March 72
111-301-051E Reverse shaft bearing is held by 2 clips instead of screw. Mainshaft bearing held in by 1 circlip instead of 2. Feb 72 - ?

Look up in book….did D or E add washer with pinion bearing? (Thinned Case support)

Transaxle Side Covers
PN#? Early Side Cover without rings
PN#? Single Ring Side Cover
PN#? Double Ring Side Cover

4 Bolt Pinion Bearing
PN#?

Big Nut Pinion Bearings
113-311-219B This bearing was obsoleted in the early 70’s, it is the only big nut pinion bearing to use the thrust washer.
002-311-219A This is the common big nut pinion bearing in older used boxes. The thrust washer was deleted and the thickness was added to the two bearings to make them stronger.
091 This is the replacement big nut pinion bearing as well as the one used on later IRS transaxles. The gear side bearing has larger rollers than the first gear side.

Pinion Bearing Nuts
002-311-223 Slit nut. These are great for your trans jig and that’s where it ends. Do not use for a transaxle as they come loose. August 69 – August 71
002-311-223A Peenable Nut. This is the common nut for the transaxle and even was called out to service replace the slit nuts in the factory manual. Sept 71 – 79

Gear Carriers
The larger bearing hole is for the mainshaft, the easy identification method is looking at how the hole was cut. The mainshaft bearing for the keyed mainshaft has a flange on it, so the bearing hole will have a small counterbore on the clip side for the bearing flange. The splined mainshaft bearing is one diameter and the casting will have a stop at the bottom of the hole for the bearing. There are two splined bearings and the difference can be seen in two locations. The castings for the later 091 bearing have an oil grove on the inside and cor-ing on the front side of the casting. The earlier 002 bearings will not have the oil grove on the inside. Converting to use the 091 bearing the oil grove must be added for the bearing.

The smaller bearing hole is for the pinion shaft, this is easiest to identify for the correct bear-ing by a bolt being present on the bottom of the casting or not.

Typically the flanged bearing for the mainshaft is with the pinion bearing that is held by a bolt, but there are a few odd balls out there. Some of the early mainshaft bearing carriers also get converted to the splined mainshaft bearing when rebuilding a transaxle, this is rare as well but has been done by shops.

113-301-173 Early Mainshaft Bearing and Early Pinion Bearing
113-301-173A Early Mainshaft Bearing and Early Pinion Bearing with Long Support for 1-2 Shift Rail 61-63? T1
113-301-173B Early Mainshaft Bearing and Early Pinion Bearing 61-72.5 T1
311-301-173 Late Mainshaft Bearing and Late Pinion Bearing 72.5-75 T1
081-301-173 ??
081-301-173A 091 Mainshaft Bearing and Late Pinion Bearing 76-79 T1
• Oil Grove for 091 Bearing
• Coring on face of casting next to shift rail exits

???-???-??? Early Mainshaft Bearing and Late Pinion Bearing 72-73 T1

001-301-173 Early Mainshaft Bearing and Late Pinion Bearing ??-?? T1
200-310-173A Rare Factory Gear Carrier with extra room for close ratio gears. 091 Mainshaft Bearing and Late Pinion Bearing.


Nose Cones
There are 2 hole and 3 hole nose cones named for the number of mounting holes on the housing. This is the biggest difference, but there are a few other differences between nose cones. Early swing axle 2 hole nose cones can be found without the reverse switch hole, which some of these get modified by people for generic reverse light switches. This can be confusing as the reverse switch may not match the switch you ordered. Most 2 and 3 hole nose cones have the same reverse switch over the reverse shift rail. Later 3 hole nose cones can have a second switch on the side activated by the hockey stick for the seat belt light sys-tem.

73 Starts the 3 hole nose cones

Differentials and Spider Gears
Early IRS differentials had 11 tooth spiders and 17 tooth side gears, these are definitely weaker than the later model 10 tooth spiders and 15 tooth side gears. Super diffs are made for only one set of gears, either the 11/17 combo or the 10/15 combo. Poor quality super diffs will have excessive run out when measuring backlash with the pinion gear, these can be machined to true up the housing. It is best to order a new super diff from a quality vendor that is ready for the 10/15 gear combo.

Ring Gears
PN#? 4.375 Ring and Pinion, 8 teeth on pinion and 35 on ring. This uses a solid spacer and the pinion shaft has a nut on the end. (??-66?)
PN#? 4.125 Ring and Pinion, 8 teeth on pinion and 33 on ring. This uses a spring spacer and the end of the pinion shaft has a clip. (67-Oct 72)
PN#? 3.88 Ring and Pinion, 8 teeth on pinion and 31 on ring. This uses a spring spacer and the end of the pinion shaft has a clip. (Nov 72 – 79)

Lower Ratios
These can be found as the factory put this in trucks and resellers have made them available here and there. These are easy to press off as the heads are so small on the pinion shafts, which technically makes them weaker.
PN#? 4.625 Ring and Pinion, 8 teeth on pinion and 37 on ring.
PN#? 5.14 Ring and Pinion, 7 teeth on pinion and 36 on ring.

Pressure Plates and Throw out Bearings
Diaphragm style pressure plates are very easy to identify between early and late, the early (70 and before) pressure plates for an unguided throw out bearing will have a flat metal area in the center covering the ends of the pressure plate fingers. The late style (71 and later) di-aphragm pressure plate will have the ends of the fingers showing in the middle and must be used with a guided throw out bearing. A trick is ordering an early style pressure plate when the pressure plate in the vehicle isn’t known as an early style can be converted to the late style by removing this metal ring feature in the center. This allows a car to remain together until the pressure plate arrives without worry of getting the wrong part. The only catch to this is sometimes the fingers will need to be clearance for the guide tube, so ordering the right part is advantageous. Although I’m sure a lot of the manufacturers are just making the one plate now.

Diaphragm pressure plates lose pressure or force for holding the clutch disc as dust builds between the fingers and the housing. This does not allow the fingers to go back all the way and simulates the clutch pedal slightly being pushed in. Compressing the fingers just enough to clean out this area with compressed air or a scraper will allow the pressure plate to fully release to give its maximum clamping. Over compressing the fingers in this process will damage the pressure plate making it useless.

The early throw out bearings (70 and before) will have two cylinders on the side to fit in the circular cutouts on the clutch shaft. The later throw out bearings (71 and later) will have two flat tabs on the side to ride on top of the rounded humps of the clutch shaft.

Clutch Shaft and Springs
There are two different diameter shafts, a 16mm and a 20mm shaft. The 16mm shafts were used to 72, but there are two versions of the 16mm shaft. The early shaft has half circle cut outs for the throw out bearing. The late version has the rounded humps for the late style throw out bearing. Partially through 72 they changed to the larger 20mm shaft and these only had the rounded humps for the late throw out bearing.

Interestingly the clutch shaft with 2 versions only has one spring and the clutch shaft with one version has two clutch springs. The 16mm shafts all use the same spring, but the 20mm shaft has two springs that change based on the arm length. The 100mm arms technically should use a longer length hook, but either 20mm spring seems to work.

Clutch Arm Length
The 16mm shaft came with a 73mm long clutch arm, other parts of the world stayed with the 16mm shaft and eventually increased the arm length to 100mm. So you can get a longer arm to reduce pedal effort for the 16mm shafts. The 20mm shaft started with a 90mm arm and then in 75 moved to the 100mm arm, but you can also change this to a 73mm arm as the 091 transaxle came with these. All arms are measured from center to center of the holes. Longer arms will reduce pedal effort but make clutch cable adjustment a little more important. A shorter arm can give more throw when pedal effort isn’t as big as a consideration (hydraulic).

Clutch Cables and Tubes
The simple version is 3 tubes and 3 cables are common for order today. The cables can be changed if more length is needed due to installing a longer clutch arm.
Tubes
• Up to 71 is 11 ¾”
• 72-73 is 12 5/8”
• 74-79 is 12 ½”
Cables
• Up to 71 2260mm (~89”)
• 72-74 2281mm (~89 ¾”)
• 74-79 2268mm (~89 ¼”)
Last edited by Casting Timmy on Sun Mar 27, 2016 6:31 pm, edited 5 times in total.

gkeeton
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed May 10, 2006 10:51 pm

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by gkeeton » Sat Mar 26, 2016 9:41 am

This site has quite a few more knowledgeable members than the samba, but I think you need to break down your list for it to be efficiently used. I would break it down into groups of 10-15 parts. Maybe have a breakdown of 1-2 sliders, their hubs, and maybe the reverse gears (Title: Type 1, 1-2 sliders, hubs, reverse). Then start a new thread with the 3-4 sliders, and their hubs (Title: Type 1, 3-4 sliders, hubs). Start a new thread with 1-2 mainshafts, and their mating 1st, and 2nd gears (Title: Type 1, 1-2 mainshafts, 1-2 gears). I think it's great that you want to create this master list, but how long did it take for you to compile it, and even type it to post it? Bruce, and mcmscott are probably two of the greatest transaxle resources willing to help over on the samba, but if they have to take more than 1/2 hour to research/post a reply, they simply have more important things to do. If the info is off the top of their head, or it takes them 5 minutes to confirm info on a part the next time they're in the shop, that's probably going to make them 10 times more likely to contribute. Having to read a list of every single part in every single Type 1 Transaxle is most likely going to be to overwhelming for most here, and I think you will get the same results if you don't take the time to break it up into 20-30 smaller groups.

Here's a start for you on the 3-4 sliders from 09, you just need to find the part numbers.
http://www.shoptalkforums.com/viewtopic ... 0&t=124219

Casting Timmy
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:42 pm

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Casting Timmy » Tue Mar 29, 2016 6:38 am

I'm slowly trying to find existing topics and then can separate it out. Hopefully in the end this can be a nice collection of topics.

Thanks
Tim

User avatar
doc
Site Admin
Posts: 3400
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2005 5:38 pm
Location: Bentonville, Arkansas
Contact:

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by doc » Tue Mar 29, 2016 7:27 am

I like it! Info will be used by many.

doc

User avatar
Henryhoehandle
Moderator
Posts: 764
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2003 3:01 am

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Henryhoehandle » Fri Apr 01, 2016 6:41 pm

I agree.. there is a lot here to sort through, but a lot of helpful info.

Casting Timmy
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:42 pm

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Casting Timmy » Tue Apr 05, 2016 7:04 am

I am working on finishing the Factory notes first and then will break it down into sections. Just a little busy at work right now and haven't had as much time lately.

Casting Timmy
Posts: 88
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 9:42 pm

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Casting Timmy » Wed Sep 13, 2017 3:14 pm

Anyone run across a dual side cover case for T1 with a 20mm clutch shaft? It's an AT box from July of 73.

Bruce2
Posts: 6776
Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2001 3:01 am

Re: Type 1 Part Numbers and Descriptions

Post by Bruce2 » Fri Sep 15, 2017 1:06 am

Yep, not too rare. I've got a couple of AH DSCs with the 20mm clutch shaft.
There was quite a long period where VW used both DSC cases and SSCs. The earliest SSC I've had was Nov 72

Post Reply