garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

General tips/tricks/tools that could be utilized on any platform.

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Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Fri Apr 28, 2017 1:10 pm

I have one of those trolly/carts but it is seldom use. If there was a car lift I am sure it would be used more. Laying on the floor or sitting on a short stool makes it awkward to keep getting up to get things out of the cart.

I also have an adjustable height stool which I use a lot but the storage area is just too small.

My barber chair is of no use at all while working on something but its great to sit in while planning (or storing things (:oops: ) something :P . I need to make a slide-a-way table for some day,

My stepdaughter was throwing away a perfectly good office chair (oogly but comfortable) so I have been using that at times too. (My garage is getting too crowded.. I wonder why?)

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Sat Apr 29, 2017 9:04 am

Got some relief from allergies for a couple of hours late in the afternoon yesterday so I got to do some fitting of the rear uprights for the box. The problem here is the lid of the box - when open does make things complicated. By removing the lid like the commercial boxes have, the build becomes a piece of cake. With the lid opening there has to be some detail (off-set of the seat support to accommodate the open lid) work done to support the seat mount.

Before I go much farther in design decisions (I am now back to my original design) I have to weld the base of the trolley together, drill then mount the caster pads to get a solid base for tacking the uprights and seat mount together for a fit check.

Options:

Since the box's lid pivots like it does the build gets complicated allowing for that. I could remove the lid and leave the top open for use (and to collect dust) which would make the build easier for sure. Other than the hinge the back of the box lacks strength but a doubler or only removing the pivot part of the hinge would solve that. Another good/bad problem is the slider that is attached to the lid that keeps the drawers closed when moving the box around. Removing that allows the drawers to slide around as they do not have locks or detents themselves; this is the good/bad part of the equation. The drawer hinges do allow the empty drawers to dance around a bit also but that has never been a real problem, just an observation.

By removing the lid the seat would be ~1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches lower (depending on the handle; keep or remove) or one could still leave it at the same height and just have the top open which brings up the next question: do I pivot the seat pad or make it a lift off seat pad:

Pivoting: Pivot is added to tilt forward which is OK but is a bit awkward. Pivot to the rear is probably more normal hence comfortable.

Lift off seat: How do you keep the seat pad from sliding around. Either locating angle brackets/blocks on the bottom of the seat or posts going into holes on the rim of the seat frame. Removing the seat pad just puts another object on the floor to trip over if your distracted by what you are doing :roll: (like I get).

Since haven't seem them in person there are several reasons to think if it the commercial units may not be that bad, cheap but the work is already done. I'm not sure about seat height and structural capabilities over the life of the units which may be a problem. Seat height possibly being low could be a problem if you are long legged or somewhat tall. Looking at their pictures they look to be built of a lighter material that I am using (scraps I have laying around mostly) hence a weight savings but... strength if you are a "chubby".... My unit is certainly going to be heavier but maybe that will help in cornering :lol: . The wheels on the commercial look to be of a smaller diameter than I am using which, if your floor has seams like mine does or a lot of cracks, the small wheel diameter can get stuck in them - they also help dictate seat height.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Tue May 02, 2017 8:35 pm

Was able to get some garage time w/no allergies.

The top of the handle sits at 18"s. The hard part comes next.
IMG_0810.JPG
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Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Sun May 07, 2017 8:08 pm

IMG_0812.JPG
In the last few days I have tried something I have never really done before. The angle stock I am using is 1" X 1" X 1/8" angle iron and I needed to put an off-set in it to allow for the lid of the tool box too open. These are the two mirrored pieces I came up with ( should have taken pictures but I didn't. I can do it again if anyone needs to see how I did it).
IMG_0812.JPG
This will give you an idea of what I am planning: the flanges are to connect to the shortened upright I will try to spot weld them in place to hold things still while I finish weld the tabs. The angle will cover the tabs and allow for a full weld and added strength. The top of the piece has not been trimmed to length yet.
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Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Mon May 08, 2017 9:01 am

:roll: (Silly me) In the bottom pix I made a mistake. Allergies were starting in again so, as I was getting a bit rummy, had quit for the day when I set up the pix. The bent piece I made was to sit 1" higher on the vertical piece of angle with a corner fill to be added later for protection from the sharp corners and for strength. This was to protect the lid of the box if it was open and it got bumped to the side accidentally when open.

The picture wasn't how my plan is/was but I could leave it this way as it as it would be easier just not look as "professional :roll: :lol: in my book and not have the additional protection for the lid.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Have you ever

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Tue May 16, 2017 2:46 pm

I finally got a chance to get back on the tool box stool and noticed that the lower frame had warped. After I finished welding the base together (and I am NOT the best of welders) I noticed that the frame had warped so one corner was about .02 off a flat surface. I had other damage done during the winter to fix and was working on that and yard work to do so when I looked at it again maybe a week later... the warp was more. I figured that I could shim up the caster on that corner with washers so I put the caster pads on and let is sit for a few more days. When I went out it had warped (lifted) to maybe an 1/8th of an inch or more (never measured it) in the one corner. After constipating it a lot I decided today to cut the welds at the two opposite corners and lay it back down then weld it.

When I did this I laid it back down (before welding) and I did get a perfect laydown so then welded the opposite corner from where the problem was; checked it and it had stayed flat. I then welded the top of the corner that wanted to warp and checked it and it had started to warp again. I cut it loose then tacked the inside corner of the join of the two pieces of .095 X 1" square tube, laid it on what I was using at a flat surface and it was OK. I then tacked the outside of the tube then checked it and it was warping again. I cut it loose then tried it again and again... it warped. I laid a straight edge on all of the tubes and it and the other pieces were straight and true. Shining a flashlight behind them and a straight edge does not let any light through.

This was left over scrap from the body mount tunnel stiffener I made for my black buggy and I seem to remember that I did have problems with one of the tubes during that job. I am wondering if the mix of the materials to make the steel has a flaw in it as one end is OK but the other end wants to do something when heat is applied at the one end only.

I did not clamp things down this time as I was welding (several reasons) but the first welding was done that way and the warping just took longer to appear. I did have the wheel pads still welded on one side (I had cut the other weld loose) to hold alignment and being straight so I'm not sure what I am doing wrong. The pad was still sitting up tight to the join. Back up to the steel yard I guess.

Ol'fogasaurus
Posts: 12719
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 1:17 am
Location: Just north of Seattle

Re: garage sitting creaper with tool box built in

Post by Ol'fogasaurus » Fri May 26, 2017 2:52 pm

I got some time in the garage today and decided to work on the tool box.

In the last installment of this tale of terror the base has warped again after several tries to fix the problem. The last attempt I made some rough cuts along the seam and tried to weld them up but it warped again. I made one last cut on the warping end and had to leave it. The other day I tried to weld the relief cut and, still using the last gas, power and speed setting I got some weird stuff.

The first try got me nothing: no spark only the wire coming out. I reset everything and this time I got a mass of soot and almost a weld. Check things over again, including moving the ground closer to the weld and after cleaning all the soot away I got a funny kind of weld more like a solder job. The wire melted but none of the noise. I moved about ½” away and got a decent weld then moved back to the other end and got to finish that.

Today I cleaned up the welds and laid the base on the flat/level bench and it was flat!!! Woo-hooo but when I turned it over to check the pads they were off again. After spending about an hour with a flap wheel on my 4 ½” grinder it sat pretty good.

Image
This shows the 13” tall front upright beam sitting about where it will be and the rear upright beam that has been modified for the open lid in place along with the top piece where the seat cushion will sit clamped roughly in place.

Image

This shows the tool box with the lid open which is the reason for the odd upright back beam.

Off to the steel salvage place to get 3’ of angle iron and some flat stock for braces to start finishing the job.

It’s been a fun but frustrating job

Update: I forgot to mention that during the next try at wekding the seam after getting all the soot I got what looked like a candle flame which created the weld that loomed like a solder job. I'm still trying to figure that one out.

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